Environment

February Science Café - LOTT's Reclaimed Water

Event: 
Tue, 02/14/2012 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

From today's inbox -

Beginning in February, Science Café of Olympia will meet at Harned Hall in Saint Martin's University at 5300 Pacific Avenue SE, Lacey.

Map and Driving Directions

"Reclaimed Water and Groundwater Infiltration: How Wastewater Becomes a Resource"
7:00 pm, Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Harned Hall, Saint Martin's University, 5300 Pacific Avenue SE, Lacey, Washington

This presentation will offer an overview of the LOTT reclaimed water and groundwater infiltration program, reclaimed water quality, how recharge sites are evaluated and selected, the design and function of engineered recharge basins, soil aquifer treatment, and relationship to constituents of emerging concern. To assure protection of local groundwater supplies, LOTT is about to begin a 4-year Groundwater Recharge Scientific Study. With continually increasing public and regulatory scrutiny, one of the key study objectives is to quantify the efficacy of soil aquifer treatment to limit fate and transport of pollutants, including constituents of emerging concern. Plans for initiating the scientific study will be discussed, including opportunities for participation in the scoping process for the study.

Winter Twig Identification Class: Afternoon Session

Add a new dimension to your winter outings when you join local plant experts to learn the secrets to identifying local shrubs and trees without their leaves. “Winter Twig Identification” is a 2.5-hour field class held at a West Olympia-area nature trail on Sunday, January 22. Please visith this link to register:  http://wintertwig2012.eventbrite.com

- 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or

- 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The class costs $5, which will be paid at the event. Participants will recieve a handout and have the opportunity to purchase the Winter in the Woods book.

The nature trail requires that vehicles display the Discover Pass, or participants can offer volunteer service at the trail in exchagne for parking during the class. More information about obtaining a Discover Pass can be found at this site: http://discoverpass.wa/gov/

If you are unable to purchase a Discover Pass and want to volunteer in exchange for a pass, please let us know in  advance. Participants in the morning class can volunteer from about 12:30 to 1:30, and those in the afternoon class can volunteer from about 11:30 to 12:30.

Participants in the winter twig workshops will be advised to dress warmly, as we walk very slowly while learning the plants. Extra warm footwear, mittens, hats, and lots of layes are a must to stay comfortable! Full information will be sent to you upon registration, about a week prior to the workshop.

 

Winter Twig Identification Class: Afternoon Session

Event: 
Sun, 01/22/2012 - 1:00pm - 3:30pm

Add a new dimension to your winter outings when you join local plant experts to learn the secrets to identifying local shrubs and trees without their leaves. “Winter Twig Identification” is a 2.5-hour field class held at a West Olympia-area nature trail on Sunday, January 22. Please visith this link to register:  http://wintertwig2012.eventbrite.com

- 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or

- 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The class costs $5, which will be paid at the event. Participants will recieve a handout and have the opportunity to purchase the Winter in the Woods book.

The nature trail requires that vehicles display the Discover Pass, or participants can offer volunteer service at the trail in exchagne for parking during the class. More information about obtaining a Discover Pass can be found at this site: http://discoverpass.wa/gov/

If you are unable to purchase a Discover Pass and want to volunteer in exchange for a pass, please let us know in  advance. Participants in the morning class can volunteer from about 12:30 to 1:30, and those in the afternoon class can volunteer from about 11:30 to 12:30.

Participants in the winter twig workshops will be advised to dress warmly, as we walk very slowly while learning the plants. Extra warm footwear, mittens, hats, and lots of layes are a must to stay comfortable! Full information will be sent to you upon registration, about a week prior to the workshop.

 

Winter Twig Identification Class: Morning Session

Add a new dimension to your winter outings when you join local plant experts to learn the secrets to identifying local shrubs and trees without their leaves. “Winter Twig Identification” is a 2.5-hour field class held at a West Olympia-area nature trail on Sunday, January 22. Please visit this link to register:

http://wintertwig2012.eventbrite.com/

- 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or

- 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The class costs $5, which will be paid at the event. Participants will recieve a handout and have the opportunity to purchase the Winter in the Woods book.

The nature trail requires that vehicles display the Discover Pass, or participants can offer volunteer service at the trail in exchagne for parking during the class. More information about obtaining a Discover Pass can be found at this site: http://discoverpass.wa/gov/

If you are unable to purchase a Discover Pass and want to volunteer in exchange for a pass, please let us know in  advance. Participants in the morning class can volunteer from about 12:30 to 1:30, and those in the afternoon class can volunteer from about 11:30 to 12:30.

Participants in the winter twig workshops will be advised to dress warmly, as we walk very slowly while learning the plants. Extra warm footwear, mittens, hats, and lots of layes are a must to stay comfortable! Full information will be sent to you upon registration, about a week prior to the workshop.

 

Winter Twig Identification Class: Morning Session

Event: 
Sun, 01/22/2012 - 10:00am - 12:30pm

Add a new dimension to your winter outings when you join local plant experts to learn the secrets to identifying local shrubs and trees without their leaves. “Winter Twig Identification” is a 2.5-hour field class held at a West Olympia-area nature trail on Sunday, January 22. Please visit this link to register:

http://wintertwig2012.eventbrite.com/

- 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or

- 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The class costs $5, which will be paid at the event. Participants will recieve a handout and have the opportunity to purchase the Winter in the Woods book.

The nature trail requires that vehicles display the Discover Pass, or participants can offer volunteer service at the trail in exchagne for parking during the class. More information about obtaining a Discover Pass can be found at this site: http://discoverpass.wa/gov/

If you are unable to purchase a Discover Pass and want to volunteer in exchange for a pass, please let us know in  advance. Participants in the morning class can volunteer from about 12:30 to 1:30, and those in the afternoon class can volunteer from about 11:30 to 12:30.

Participants in the winter twig workshops will be advised to dress warmly, as we walk very slowly while learning the plants. Extra warm footwear, mittens, hats, and lots of layes are a must to stay comfortable! Full information will be sent to you upon registration, about a week prior to the workshop.

 

Thurston PUD considers public power

Apparently, the Thurston County PUD Commissioners are considering doing a study of the feasibility of public power in our area. (As I understand it, in the most basic terms, this would involve buying out Puget Sound Energy's facilities in our area, and would offer two principle possible benefits - more local control, and reduced costs for consumers (mostly because PUDs have priority rights to the cheaper power produced by Bonneville's publicly constructed dams.) At this point, PSE's average power cost is about 6.5 cents, vs. 3.2 cents for BPA, and the Washington State PUD Association did a study concluding that such shifts would save the newly created PUD's customers "up to 20%" on their electric bills. (Unfortunately, this second benefit wouldn't mean that there was any more cheap renewable power in the grid - it would just mean that we got a somewhat bigger share of the pie, and that the customers of private utilities got a somewhat smaller share.) Apparently, several other PUDs in PSE's service area are considering similar moves.

Emmett O'Connell posted about this issue when it was debated by the candidates for Commissioner in the 2008 PUD election, and included video of their discussion, but you probably weren't glued to the screen following that...

Currently, the Thurston PUD only deals with supplying water to about 4,000 connections (although many other PUDs around the state are electric utilities, and a few are starting to provide some public internet access) so this would transform the utility.

I got a forwarded email about this, saying:

Thurston PUD considers public power

Event: 
Tue, 01/10/2012 - 5:00pm

Apparently, the Thurston County PUD Commissioners are considering doing a study of the feasibility of public power in our area. (As I understand it, in the most basic terms, this would involve buying out Puget Sound Energy's facilities in our area, and would offer two principle possible benefits - more local control, and reduced costs for consumers (mostly because PUDs have priority rights to the cheaper power produced by Bonneville's publicly constructed dams.) At this point, PSE's average power cost is about 6.5 cents, vs. 3.2 cents for BPA, and the Washington State PUD Association did a study concluding that such shifts would save the newly created PUD's customers "up to 20%" on their electric bills. (Unfortunately, this second benefit wouldn't mean that there was any more cheap renewable power in the grid - it would just mean that we got a somewhat bigger share of the pie, and that the customers of private utilities got a somewhat smaller share.) Apparently, several other PUDs in PSE's service area are considering similar moves.

Emmett O'Connell posted about this issue when it was debated by the candidates for Commissioner in the 2008 PUD election, and included video of their discussion, but you probably weren't glued to the screen following that...

Currently, the Thurston PUD only deals with supplying water to about 4,000 connections (although many other PUDs around the state are electric utilities, and a few are starting to provide some public internet access) so this would transform the utility.

I got a forwarded email about this, saying:

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