ecology

Train Carries Proppants for Oil Fracking Through Downtown Olympia

Jefferson Street Tracks with Train Coming from Port
Jefferson Street Tracks with Train Coming from Port (see larger)

+ some thoughts about fracking:
Maybe the ultimate problem with fracking (and other extreme fossil fuel extraction, like oceanic deepwater and oilsands,) is that society is already living far beyond the sustainable carrying capacity of the planet (...much less living alongside, and in harmony with natural planetary systems.) These extreme extraction industries further enable the growth-based economic system to continue. When what is really necessary is curtailment. Not growth. Growth is a problem. We need solutions. Like  efficiency and conservation, and urgent transition to renewables. The real political prerogative needs to be achieving overall economic curtailment, while ensuring uplift for all the world's poorest, and most disadvantaged. ...so how can true, long-term sustainability be achieved?...(please, pardon me *staring dreamily into space* :).

Additional related thoughts:
Jobs are needed, yes. And good jobs. There has got to be a better way than for jobs that go to support fossil fuel industry Billionaires.

Port and Environment

Port of Olympia Marine Terminal has two main major clients, one is timber export, the other is proppant import. Both clients have questionable environmental impacts. Proppants are used in the hydraulic-fracturing process. Timber comes from clearcutting. Recently, the port has been appreciated for increasing its income to the point where it will no longer be operating at a financial loss. Much of this improvement is due to the hard work of port staffers, and they deserve commendation and congratulations for their hard work. Still, questions remain. If the port's business model depends on activities that harm the environment, then has the real cost to future generations been truly and accurately accounted for?


Here's a video of a recent bulk log carrier, the Aster K, loading up. As of the 1st of December, the Spinnaker SW has been loading logs.

Percival Landing Kiosk Shelter with Oyster Art History Exhibit
Percival Landing art exhibit, story of the Oysters of Budd Bay—Oysters have been in extreme decline, ever since over-harvesting and heavy industry combined to make conditions adverse.

Aster K — Bulk Log Carrier
Aster K, Weyerhauser ship, alongside Port Marine Terminal Pier

Pollution at Abandoned Westbay Industrial Site

Stream at Abandoned Industrial Site
I was at this site last week to photograph one of the recent log carrier ships that has been in port, and while I was there I noticed a strong smell of sulphur emanating from the pit shown in the above photograph.

There is more information about the site clean-up at the Washington State Department of Ecology website, here.

BMT (Brown Minneapolis Tank) AKA Reliable Steel, has relocated their local operation to Elma, WA.

Pulling Creosoted Pilings in Budd Bay

Pulling creosoted pilings, removal of toxic columns: reason to celebrate. More information about this in a recent article by John Dodge, in the Olympian newspaper: Budd relieved of creosote.

More information from the Port of Olympia, Multi-Partner Project will Remove Hundreds of Toxic Creosote Pilings from Budd Inlet Shores

Questions: why hasn't the creosote industry paid more for clean up? Why has the burden been thrust onto the public to pay majority costs for clean up? Is it proper for the public to subsidize private for profit business operations?

Come Join our Stormwater Stewards! Trained community resources for stormwater management.

Volunteers Sought for New “Stormwater Stewards” Program
Thurston County Stormwater Utility/Stream Team Program and WSU Extension arerecruiting volunteers to train as "Stormwater Stewards." The program works with localresidents to help reduce pollution in our local waterways and Puget Sound from stormwaterrunoff.
Volunteers receive training in many aspects of on-site stormwater management includingrain gardens, water-wise plants, sloped biodetention hedgerows, pervious pavements,vegetated roofs, and more. Trained volunteers use their new expertise to work in teams toprovide guidance to homeowners who want to do their part to protect local waterways andPuget Sound.


Classes and hands-on field trainings will be held in the evenings and on weekends toaccommodate work schedules. Landscaping professionals are also encouraged to take part inthe volunteer certification program. The training dates are evenings on Thursdays, May 10,17, 31, June 7 and 21, with field days on June 10, 23, and 30.


To learn more and receive an application packet, contact WSU Extension’s Native PlantSalvage Program at Erica@nativeplantsalvage.org or 360-867-2164.

"Fiduciary Responsibility" and Eliminating the Investor/Ownership Class

Had a great conversation at Sizizis under the Jupiter full Moon early Thursday morning about how the socio-cultural-economic harms people, and leaves them hanging. Rampant fear, distrust, disease. The real trickle-downs from the predatory Wall Street style economic system.

The worst part is that the system is set-up so the big corporations actually have a "fiduciary responsibility" to cut throats in order to be most attractive to investors.

Maybe we would be better off eliminating the owner/investor class from our society, if people are not able to refrain from hurting each other, and killing each other, in their quest to accumulate wealth...

And thanks for the hot chocolate!

b

Jupiter (nearly) Full Moon with Halo
Wednesday, 9 November, 2011
In this photo, the full Moon is conjunct Jupiter.
Airplane crosses from SW to NE in the 7 or 8 o'clock position inside the halo.
There was ground fog in the park tonight.

McLane Wetland Panoramas

Untitled 1
view larger: Untitled 1

Three more panoramas, and a video, below the break:

Global Water Dances Olympia


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49nuxu-VZJ0
www.globalwaterdances.org/location/olympia.html

June 2011
There was a great turn-out of I would estimate about 40 people or so. We gathered at Moxlie Basin in Watershed Park, then hiked to a parking lot where Indian Creek emerges from an underground culvert, then to Yashiro Garden for the Global Dance, and then to Eastbay, where Moxlie Creek (combined with Indian Creek) join the Salish Sea.

Global Water Dances website: www.globalwaterdances.org/

Leaves at Yashiro Garden

[UPDATE: video from the event posted here: olyblog.net/global-water-dances-olympia]

Leaves at Yashiro City of Olympia Japanese Garden
Leaves at Yashiro City of Olympia Japanese Garden

June 2011
Yashiro Garden was the site of the Olympia performance of Global Water Dances, yesterday, Saturday the 25th of June.

There was a great turn-out of I would estimate about 40 people or so. We gathered at Moxlie Basin in Watershed Park, then hiked to a parking lot where Indian Creek emerges from an underground culvert, then to Yashiro Garden for the Global Dance, and then to Eastbay, where Moxlie Creek (combined with Indian Creek) join the Salish Sea.

Global Water Dances website: www.globalwaterdances.org/

Thanks to all who made this happen, and to all who participated!

Moxlie Springs Basin
Forest view at Moxlie Springs Basin in Watershed Park

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