spscc

SPSCC Concert Choir Debuts Tomorrow

The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir will team up with the Puget Sound Community Choir to kick off its season, as well as start to set the holiday mood with “Sing We Clear,” coming to the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts on Wednesday, Dec. 1.

Led by director Molly McNamara and piano accompanist Jennifer Herman, the choirs will also be joined by musicians from the Olympia Chamber Orchestra. This year’s title, “Sing We Clear,” is a lyric from an old English carol, “Masters in this Hall,” just one of many seasonal songs the choirs will perform.

The concert begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at the Minnaert Center Main Stage. Tickets are $7.50 for adults, and $5 for seniors and students. All tickets are subject to a $2.50 service charge. Tickets can be purchased online at OlyTix.org, or by calling the Minnaert Center box office at (360) 753-8586.

 

Glenn Greenwald at SPSCC: When the word terrorism is used as a weapon to erode civil liberties

Glenn Greenwald at SPSCC Presented by BRICK, Monday 1 November 2010 The SPSCC student group BRICK (Building Revolution by Increasing Community Knowledge) brought social critic and activist Glenn Greenwald to town yesterday for a speech about civil rights and terrorism in the era of the Obama Administration. Greenwald is a regular contributor to Salon.com, and there is more information about his current tour there, and more information about him, and his visit to SPSCC on the BRICK website here.

Greenwald was trained as a constitutional attorney, and practiced as a litigator in New York before giving up on the courts to become a writer. He has written articles for The New York Times, LA Times, Harper's, and other noteworthy publications.

Greenwald talked about popular conceptions of civil liberties and terrorism, and detailed how these are often false. For example, even though the definition of civil liberties is quite simple—it's basically the set of rules that protect people against government intrusion (e.g. freedom of speech, and protection against unreasonable search and seizure)—that a lot of people don't understand what civil liberties are about. When you think about civil liberties, think about the Bill of Rights.

And terrorism, in contrast, is something that people popularly think they know and understand, but in reality, the definition is really nebulous and popularly misunderstood.

More Recent Photos, 30 July '10

Diversity and Equity Center
29 July 2010—This is the Diversity and Equity Center at SPSCC (South Puget Sound Community College.) I was at the student union building on campus to deliver the August issue of WIP (Works in Progress.) As always, the WIP welcomes submissions from from community members, please send your letters to the editor, and if you have ideas for feature articles, contact the editor to check in and see if there might be space in the paper. olywip@gmail.com

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later

'Laramie Project' returns to South Puget Sound '10 Years Later'

More than eight years since the South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department hosted The Laramie Project, a play highlighting the death of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard. Now, the play returns in a new form as The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, revisiting the community and its ongoing struggle to cope with what happened that night. The play opens on Thursday, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.

On Nov. 6, 1998, Shepard left the Fireside Bar with Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson. The following day he was discovered on a prairie at the edge of town, tied to a fence, brutally beaten, and close to death. Six days later Matthew Shepard died at Poudre Valley Hospital in Ft. Collins, Colo. Just eight days later, 10 members of Tectonic Theatre Project traveled to Laramie, Wyo. and conducted interviews with the people of the town.

Over the next year, the company returned to Laramie six times and conducted over 200 interviews. These texts became the basis for the play The Laramie Project.

Ten years later, on Sept. 12, 2008, five members of Tectonic returned to Laramie to try to understand the long-term effect of the murder. They found a town wrestling with its legacy and its place in history. In addition to revisiting the folks whose words riveted audiences in the original play, this time around, the company also spoke with the two murderers, McKinney and Henderson, as well as Matthew's mother, Judy Shepard. The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later is a bold new work, which asks the question, "How does society write its own history?"

The show runs from Aug. 5-8 and Aug. 12-15 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The Aug. 8 and Aug. 15 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m.

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later

'Laramie Project' returns to South Puget Sound '10 Years Later'

More than eight years since the South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department hosted The Laramie Project, a play highlighting the death of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard. Now, the play returns in a new form as The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, revisiting the community and its ongoing struggle to cope with what happened that night. The play opens on Thursday, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.

On Nov. 6, 1998, Shepard left the Fireside Bar with Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson. The following day he was discovered on a prairie at the edge of town, tied to a fence, brutally beaten, and close to death. Six days later Matthew Shepard died at Poudre Valley Hospital in Ft. Collins, Colo. Just eight days later, 10 members of Tectonic Theatre Project traveled to Laramie, Wyo. and conducted interviews with the people of the town.

Over the next year, the company returned to Laramie six times and conducted over 200 interviews. These texts became the basis for the play The Laramie Project.

Ten years later, on Sept. 12, 2008, five members of Tectonic returned to Laramie to try to understand the long-term effect of the murder. They found a town wrestling with its legacy and its place in history. In addition to revisiting the folks whose words riveted audiences in the original play, this time around, the company also spoke with the two murderers, McKinney and Henderson, as well as Matthew's mother, Judy Shepard. The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later is a bold new work, which asks the question, "How does society write its own history?"

The show runs from Aug. 5-8 and Aug. 12-15 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The Aug. 8 and Aug. 15 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m.

'Showtune' a Performance to Move, Sing Along With (FINAL WEEK!)

The South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department is paying homage to Jerry Herman, one of the most celebrated Broadway composers and lyricists of our time, with a staging of Showtune, an off-Broadway show inspired by Herman’s autobiography. Penning some of the stage’s biggest hits, Herman was nominated for five Tony Awards throughout his career and won two, also earning the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in Theater. Incorporating hit song after hit song, Showtune aims to please audiences young and old alike with witty lyrics set to iconic tunes from shows like Hello, Dolly!, Mame, La Cage aux Folles and more. The show runs from May 27-30 and June 3-6 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The May 30 and June 6 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 for the general public and $10 for students, staff and faculty. Performances on May 27 and June 3 are “pay what you can” nights. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5411.

'Waterways to Broadway' Choir Concert Begins June 9

The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir is back in action this spring with From Waterways to Broadway, taking place on Wednesday, June 9 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. As the show’s name implies, the first half will hold an aquatic theme, focusing on the world of water in song, including “Loch Lomond,” “The Seal Lullaby,” “Away from the Roll of the Sea,” “Wood River” and “Song for the Mira (River).” The show then transitions into a number of Broadway classics, including medleys from The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, as well as a variety of solos, duets and small ensembles. The South Puget Sound concert choir, performing alongside the Puget Sound Community Choir, is directed by Molly McNamara with piano accompanist Jennifer Hermann. The concert begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $7.50 for seniors or students with valid IDs and $5 for children 12 and under. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5507.

From Waterways to Broadway

'Waterways to Broadway' Choir Concert Begins June 9 The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir is back in action this spring with From Waterways to Broadway, taking place on Wednesday, June 9 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. As the show’s name implies, the first half will hold an aquatic theme, focusing on the world of water in song, including “Loch Lomond,” “The Seal Lullaby,” “Away from the Roll of the Sea,” “Wood River” and “Song for the Mira (River).” The show then transitions into a number of Broadway classics, including medleys from The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, as well as a variety of solos, duets and small ensembles. The South Puget Sound concert choir, performing alongside the Puget Sound Community Choir, is directed by Molly McNamara with piano accompanist Jennifer Hermann. The concert begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $7.50 for seniors or students with valid IDs and $5 for children 12 and under. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5507.

Andy Bichlbaum Presents at the Capitol Theatre

[now updated with photo link to the Dow Chemical Golden Skeleton.]

Andy Bichlbaum of the Yes Men at the Capitol Theatre in Olympia Washington

April 26, 2010 — Olympia, Washington

The South Puget Sound Community College student group B.R.I.C.K. (Building Resistance by Increasing Community Knowledge) hosted Andy Bichlbaum of the Yes Men at the Capitol Theatre.

The Yes Men are composed of Andy B. and Mike Bonanno. During the presentation, Andy mostly talked about what the Yes Men have done, how they work, and also about their recent film, The Yes Men Fix the World.
Andy Bichlbaum of The Yes Men
at the Capitol Theatre in Olympia Washington

Soil Not Oil | Vandana Shiva to Speak in Olympia

We face a stark choice... Sponsored by BRICK (Building Revolution by Increasing Community Knowledge).

VANDANA SHIVA TO SPEAK IN OLYMPIA--SPSCC
Date: Thursday, October 15, 2009
Time: 6:30PM - 9:30PM PDT
Location: Minnaert Center at SPSCC
2011 Mottman Rd SW
Olympia, WA 98512

Information provided by the TC ProNet Calendar

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