South Puget Sound Community College

SPSCC Concert Choir Debuts Tomorrow

The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir will team up with the Puget Sound Community Choir to kick off its season, as well as start to set the holiday mood with “Sing We Clear,” coming to the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts on Wednesday, Dec. 1.

Led by director Molly McNamara and piano accompanist Jennifer Herman, the choirs will also be joined by musicians from the Olympia Chamber Orchestra. This year’s title, “Sing We Clear,” is a lyric from an old English carol, “Masters in this Hall,” just one of many seasonal songs the choirs will perform.

The concert begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at the Minnaert Center Main Stage. Tickets are $7.50 for adults, and $5 for seniors and students. All tickets are subject to a $2.50 service charge. Tickets can be purchased online at OlyTix.org, or by calling the Minnaert Center box office at (360) 753-8586.

 

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later

'Laramie Project' returns to South Puget Sound '10 Years Later'

More than eight years since the South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department hosted The Laramie Project, a play highlighting the death of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard. Now, the play returns in a new form as The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, revisiting the community and its ongoing struggle to cope with what happened that night. The play opens on Thursday, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.

On Nov. 6, 1998, Shepard left the Fireside Bar with Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson. The following day he was discovered on a prairie at the edge of town, tied to a fence, brutally beaten, and close to death. Six days later Matthew Shepard died at Poudre Valley Hospital in Ft. Collins, Colo. Just eight days later, 10 members of Tectonic Theatre Project traveled to Laramie, Wyo. and conducted interviews with the people of the town.

Over the next year, the company returned to Laramie six times and conducted over 200 interviews. These texts became the basis for the play The Laramie Project.

Ten years later, on Sept. 12, 2008, five members of Tectonic returned to Laramie to try to understand the long-term effect of the murder. They found a town wrestling with its legacy and its place in history. In addition to revisiting the folks whose words riveted audiences in the original play, this time around, the company also spoke with the two murderers, McKinney and Henderson, as well as Matthew's mother, Judy Shepard. The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later is a bold new work, which asks the question, "How does society write its own history?"

The show runs from Aug. 5-8 and Aug. 12-15 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The Aug. 8 and Aug. 15 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m.

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later

'Laramie Project' returns to South Puget Sound '10 Years Later'

More than eight years since the South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department hosted The Laramie Project, a play highlighting the death of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard. Now, the play returns in a new form as The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, revisiting the community and its ongoing struggle to cope with what happened that night. The play opens on Thursday, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.

On Nov. 6, 1998, Shepard left the Fireside Bar with Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson. The following day he was discovered on a prairie at the edge of town, tied to a fence, brutally beaten, and close to death. Six days later Matthew Shepard died at Poudre Valley Hospital in Ft. Collins, Colo. Just eight days later, 10 members of Tectonic Theatre Project traveled to Laramie, Wyo. and conducted interviews with the people of the town.

Over the next year, the company returned to Laramie six times and conducted over 200 interviews. These texts became the basis for the play The Laramie Project.

Ten years later, on Sept. 12, 2008, five members of Tectonic returned to Laramie to try to understand the long-term effect of the murder. They found a town wrestling with its legacy and its place in history. In addition to revisiting the folks whose words riveted audiences in the original play, this time around, the company also spoke with the two murderers, McKinney and Henderson, as well as Matthew's mother, Judy Shepard. The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later is a bold new work, which asks the question, "How does society write its own history?"

The show runs from Aug. 5-8 and Aug. 12-15 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The Aug. 8 and Aug. 15 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m.

'Showtune' a Performance to Move, Sing Along With (FINAL WEEK!)

The South Puget Sound Community College Drama Department is paying homage to Jerry Herman, one of the most celebrated Broadway composers and lyricists of our time, with a staging of Showtune, an off-Broadway show inspired by Herman’s autobiography. Penning some of the stage’s biggest hits, Herman was nominated for five Tony Awards throughout his career and won two, also earning the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in Theater. Incorporating hit song after hit song, Showtune aims to please audiences young and old alike with witty lyrics set to iconic tunes from shows like Hello, Dolly!, Mame, La Cage aux Folles and more. The show runs from May 27-30 and June 3-6 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The May 30 and June 6 performances begin at 2 p.m. All other performances begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 for the general public and $10 for students, staff and faculty. Performances on May 27 and June 3 are “pay what you can” nights. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5411.

'Waterways to Broadway' Choir Concert Begins June 9

The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir is back in action this spring with From Waterways to Broadway, taking place on Wednesday, June 9 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. As the show’s name implies, the first half will hold an aquatic theme, focusing on the world of water in song, including “Loch Lomond,” “The Seal Lullaby,” “Away from the Roll of the Sea,” “Wood River” and “Song for the Mira (River).” The show then transitions into a number of Broadway classics, including medleys from The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, as well as a variety of solos, duets and small ensembles. The South Puget Sound concert choir, performing alongside the Puget Sound Community Choir, is directed by Molly McNamara with piano accompanist Jennifer Hermann. The concert begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $7.50 for seniors or students with valid IDs and $5 for children 12 and under. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5507.

From Waterways to Broadway

'Waterways to Broadway' Choir Concert Begins June 9 The South Puget Sound Community College Concert Choir is back in action this spring with From Waterways to Broadway, taking place on Wednesday, June 9 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. As the show’s name implies, the first half will hold an aquatic theme, focusing on the world of water in song, including “Loch Lomond,” “The Seal Lullaby,” “Away from the Roll of the Sea,” “Wood River” and “Song for the Mira (River).” The show then transitions into a number of Broadway classics, including medleys from The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, as well as a variety of solos, duets and small ensembles. The South Puget Sound concert choir, performing alongside the Puget Sound Community Choir, is directed by Molly McNamara with piano accompanist Jennifer Hermann. The concert begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $7.50 for seniors or students with valid IDs and $5 for children 12 and under. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling (360) 753-8586. For more information about the performances, go online at www.spscc.ctc.edu/entertainment or call (360) 596-5507.

Ghostly Discussion Tonight at Hawks Prairie Campus

South Puget Sound Associate Professor of Sociology Dan Hall and the Olympia Paranormal Society (OPS) will team up tonight for a presentation entitled, “Sociology Meets the Paranormal.” The presentation will focus on using the concepts of sociology, like the social construct of reality, belief systems and subcultures, to examine a number of paranormal phenomena, from apparitions and haunting to “shadow people” and disembodied voices. Ghosts and haunting will particularly be the focus. Hall, an observer and participant with the Bellingham Observers of the Odd and Obscure (BOOO), will also draw from his experiences there, having investigated several cases in the Bellingham area. Basics of investigating paranormal events will also be covered. Lastly, Hall said he’ll play some Electronic Voice Phenomena recorded during his investigations. The OPS is also looking to into anomalies in the greater Olympia area. The presentation will take place at 7 p.m. at the South Puget Sound Hawks Prairie Center, located at 1401 Marvin Rd. NE, Suite 201 in Lacey, in Room 118. The presentation is free and is open to all. For more information about the event, contact Hall at olympiaparanormal@yahoo.com.

Do you know Olympia's haunted hot spots? Find out TONIGHT!

South Puget Sound Associate Professor of Sociology Dan Hall and the Olympia Paranormal Society (OPS) will team up tonight for a presentation entitled, “Sociology Meets the Paranormal.” The presentation will focus on using the concepts of sociology, like the social construct of reality, belief systems and subcultures, to examine a number of paranormal phenomena, from apparitions and haunting to “shadow people” and disembodied voices. Ghosts and haunting will particularly be the focus. Hall, an observer and participant with the Bellingham Observers of the Odd and Obscure (BOOO), will also draw from his experiences there, having investigated several cases in the Bellingham area. Basics of investigating paranormal events will also be covered. Lastly, Hall said he’ll play some Electronic Voice Phenomena recorded during his investigations. The OPS is also looking to into anomalies in the greater Olympia area. The presentation will take place at 7 p.m. at the South Puget Sound Hawks Prairie Center, located at 1401 Marvin Rd. NE, Suite 201 in Lacey, in Room 118. The presentation is free and is open to all. For more information about the event, contact Hall at olympiaparanormal@yahoo.com.

Second Annual Earth Day Celebration

Vicki Robin, Dee Williams Highlight College's Earth Day Event

Author Vicki Robin and activist Dee Williams are set to headline South Puget Sound Community College’s Earth Day Celebration, taking place Thursday, April 23 at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The event, which begins at 11 a.m. and runs through 2 p.m., will feature a range of activities, booths, speakers and demonstrations.

Robin and Williams are the featured speakers. Robin, co-author of “Your Money or Your Life: Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence,” has been a guest on hundreds of radio and television shows, from National Public Radio to The Oprah Winfrey Show. Called the prophet of "consumption-downsizers" by the New York Times, she is a frequent speaker on this issue at conferences; to corporate, academic, religious and environmental institutions; and at professional meetings of organizations seeking to understand and contribute to the national trend toward sustainable lifestyles.

Williams, who lives in an 84-square-foot home in Olympia, Her story has been featured in a number of publications including Time and Popular Science and on television and radio programs including CBS Good Morning America. Her home, completed in 2004, includes a solar power array, sustainable materials and a primitive water/sewer set-up. In addition to talking about making living more sustainably a reality, Williams will also have her house on display outside the Minnaert Center.

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